Tag: Florida power of attorney

How Will Tax Reform Impact Seniors and Persons with Disabilities?

estate planning lawyer to assist with the effect of new tax law, and estate planning for tax purposes compared to estate planning goals and objectivesThe Tax Cut and Jobs Act (TCJA) is now officially law. Both the House and Senate passed the new tax reform bill in December with straight party-line votes and no support from Democrats. President Trump signed it into law right before Christmas. It is the first overhaul of the tax code in more than 30 years.

It’s Good News for Most Americans

Retirees, most of whom are on relatively fixed incomes, are probably the most concerned about what the new tax law will mean for them. But, generally, they will be less affected than others because the changes do not affect how Social Security and investment income are taxed. In fact, many will benefit from the doubling of the standard deduction and, with the new individual tax brackets and rates, will be paying less in taxes when they file their tax returns in April, 2019. (Most of the changes will apply to 2018 income, not 2017 income.)

Key Individual Provisions to Know

Here are main provisions in the tax law that could particularly affect retirees and persons with disabilities. These individual provisions are set to expire at the end of 2025 so Congress will need to act before then if they are to continue.

(Mostly) Lower Individual Income Tax Rates and Brackets

There are still seven individual tax brackets and rates, but most are lower. Current rates are 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, 35% and 39.6%. Here are the new rates and how much income will apply to each:

Rate                 Individuals                               Married, filing jointly

10%                 Up to $9,525                           Up to $19,050
12%                 $9,526 to $38,700                   $19,051 to $77,400
22%                 $38,701 to $82,500                 $77,401 to $165,000
24%                 $82,501 to $157,500               $165,001 to $315,000
32%                 $157,501 to $200,000             $315,001 to $400,000
35%                 $200,001 to $500,000             $400,001 to $600,000
37%                 $500,001 and over                  $600,001 and over

Standard Deduction is Almost Doubled

For single filers, the standard deduction is increased from $6,350 to $12,000. For married couples filing jointly, it increases from $12,700 to $24,000. Under the new law, fewer filers would choose to itemize, as the only reason to continue to itemize is if deductions exceed the standard deduction.

 

Personal and Elderly Exemptions

Currently, you can claim a $4,050 personal exemption for yourself, your spouse and each dependent, which lowers your taxable income and resulting taxes. The new law eliminates these personal exemptions, replacing them with the increased standard deduction.

The blind and elderly deduction has been retained in the new law. People age 65 and over (or blind) can claim an additional $1,550 deduction if they file as single or head-of-household. Married couples filing jointly can claim $1,250 if one meets the requirement and $2,500 if both do.

Medical Expenses Deduction

Currently, people with high medical expenses can deduct the portion of those expenses that exceeds 10% of their income. For example, a couple with $50,000 in income and $10,000 in medical expenses can deduct $5,000 of those medical expenses.

The new law increases this to medical expenses that exceed 7.5% of income. In the example above, the couple would be able to deduct $6,250 of their expenses. Note that this part of the new law applies to medical expenses for 2017 and 2018.

State and Local Tax (SALT) Deduction

The amount you pay in state and local property taxes, income and sales taxes can be deducted from your Federal income taxes—and the amount you can currently deduct is unlimited. The new law limits the deduction for these local and state taxes to $10,000.

Residents in the vast majority of counties in the U.S. claim an average SALT deduction below $10,000. Most low- and middle-income families who currently itemize because of their SALT deduction will likely take the much higher standard deduction unless their total itemized deductions (including SALT) are more than $12,000 if single and $24,000 if married filing jointly.

Originally lawmakers in the House and Senate wanted to repeal SALT entirely, to help pay for the tax cuts, but lawmakers in high-tax states (specifically CA, IL, NY and NJ) fought to keep it in. Those in higher income households in high-tax states will benefit from the SALT deduction.

Lower Cap on Mortgage Interest Deduction

Currently, if you take out a new mortgage on a first or second home, you can deduct the interest on up to $1 million of debt. The new law puts the cap at $750,000 of debt. (If you already have a mortgage, you would not be affected.) The new law also eliminates the deduction for interest on home equity loans, which is currently allowed on loans up to $100,000.

Temporary Credit for Non-Child Dependents

Under the new law, parents will be able to take a $500 credit for each non-child dependent they are supporting. This would include a child age 17 or older, an ailing elderly parent or an adult child with a disability. It is temporary because it is set to expire at the end of 2025 along with the other individual provisions.

Higher Exemptions for Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT)

The AMT was created almost 50 years ago to prevent the very rich from taking so many deductions that they paid no income taxes. It requires high-income earners to run their numbers twice (under regular tax rules and under the stricter AMT rules) and pay the higher amount in taxes. But because the AMT wasn’t tied to inflation, it has gradually been affecting a growing number of middle-class earners. The new tax law reduces the number of filers who would be affected by the AMT by increasing the current income exemption levels for individuals from $54,300 to $70,300 and for married couples from $84,500 to $109,400.

Federal Estate Tax Exemptions Doubled

The new law does not repeal the Federal estate tax, but it eliminates it for almost everyone by doubling the estate tax exemption to $11.2 million for individuals and $22.4 million for married couples. Amounts over these exemptions will be taxed at 40%. The new rates are effective starting January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2025.

Eliminates Individual Mandate to Buy Health Insurance

With the elimination of the individual mandate to purchase health insurance, there will no longer be a penalty for not buying insurance. This is expected to help offset the cost of the tax bill and save money by reducing the amount the federal government spends on insurance subsidies and Medicaid.

The Congressional Budget Office expects that fewer consumers who qualify for subsidies are expected to enroll on Obama Care exchanges and fewer people who are eligible for Medicaid will seek coverage and learn they can sign up for the program. (Estimates of those who are expected to have no health insurance by 2027 are all over the place, ranging from 3-5 million to 13 million.)

Critics, including AARP, claim that eliminating the individual mandate will drive up health care premiums, result in more uninsured Americans and add $1.46 trillion to the deficit over the next ten years, which could trigger automatic spending cuts to Medicare, Medicaid, and other entitlement programs unless Congress votes to stop them.

Some claim the individual mandate helps to encourage younger and healthier Americans to sign up for coverage. Without it, the individual market might lean more toward sicker and older consumers, which might lead some insurers to drop out of the market. 29% of current enrollees on the federal exchange already have only one option in 2018. Others maintain that the mandate is not a key driver for obtaining insurance. About 4 million taxpayers paid the penalty in 2016.

Inflation Adjustments Slowed

The new tax law uses “chained CPI” to measure inflation, which is a slower measure than that currently used. This means that deductions, credits and exemptions will be worth less over time because the inflation-adjusted dollars that determine eligibility and maximum value would grow more slowly. It would also subject more of your income to higher rates in the future.

529 Plans Expanded

529 plans have been a tax-advantaged way to save for college costs. The new tax law expands the use of tax-free distributions from these plans, including paying for elementary and secondary school expenses for private, public and religious school, as well as some home schooling expenses. Educational therapies for children with disabilities are also included. There is a $10,000 annual limit per student.

ABLE Accounts Adjusted

ABLE accounts, established under Section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code, allow some individuals with disabilities to retain higher amounts of savings without losing their Social Security and Medicaid benefits. The new tax law allows money in a 529 education plan to be rolled over to a 529A ABLE account, but rollovers may count toward the annual contribution limit for ABLE accounts ($15,000 in 2018). The new law also changes the rules on contributions to ABLE accounts by designated beneficiaries who have earned income from employment.

What to Watch

Expect some clarifications and strategies as the experts weigh in. There will also undoubtedly be some adjustments as the new tax bill goes into effect.  Please don’t hesitate to reach out if you have questions about these new provisions and how they may impact you or those you work with.

If you would like to have professional assistance determining how the provisions of the TCJA might affect you, then you should consult with an experienced estate planning attorney to help you evaluate the impact on you and your loved ones, as well as how you can plan around the TCJA to maximize the benefit to you and your family.

 

Differences between Lifetime and Deathtime Planning… Why a Comprehensive Estate Plan Must Include Both

According to a March 2017 survey by Caring.com, six out of ten Americans have no will or any other kind of estate planning. Many said they’d get around to it, eventually. When they’re old. (The survey did find that the elderly are much more likely to have some plan in place.) It’s all too clear that most of us think “estate planning” is a euphemism for “deathtime” planning. Indeed, in the Caring.com survey, one-third said that they didn’t need an estate plan because they didn’t have any assets to give someone when they’d died.

However, comprehensive estate planning isn’t just deathtime planning. It’s lifetime planning, too. It’s about ensuring that your medical and financial decisions can be made by someone that you trust when you are unable to make those decision for yourself. Lifetime planning can help you address potential tax liabilities, find you benefit programs you may eligible for, and protect your family from costly guardianship or conservatorship court. It can make sure that a trusted party looks after and protects your affairs, if and when you’re not able to.

Lifetime Planning Tools

As estate planners, we have an arsenal of lifetime planning tools to benefit our clients, and we custom-tailor such plans to meet each individual’s needs. Here are a couple of the most common (and necessary) lifetime planning tools you should discuss with us.

Revocable living trusts

When people hear the word “trust,” they may think of “trust fund babies” or think that trusts are something only for the super-rich.

However, a trust is simply a legal tool that can help almost anyone with property – not just the wealthy. In a trust, assets you own are re-titled and transferred into the trust. When this happens, technically, you no longer own your real estate, stocks, bonds and similar properties. Instead, the trust owns them all. But you still control everything in the trust: You can buy and sell these assets as if they were still in your name. In fact, revocable living trusts don’t even change your income taxes while you’re alive. You continue to file your tax returns as you always have, making them very easy to administer while you’re alive. As the creator (grantor or settlor) of the trust, you can continue to make changes to the trust as long as you’re competent to do so.

When you die, the trust becomes irrevocable, meaning its terms can’t generally be changed. At this point, your chosen successor trustee distributes assets to beneficiaries (the people, such as your spouse, children, a church, or other charity, you named to inherit from you). In many respects, the role of the trustee is similar to that of the executor of a will. But, a trustee of a fully funded trust doesn’t have to go through the both public and expensive probate process. Trusts are private, unlike wills, which can also provide valuable privacy to your family and ultimately help preserve your assets for the people you want to benefit from your estate.

Durable power of attorney

Durable powers of attorney come in two forms. With a standard durable power of attorney, a person is legally designated to act on your behalf, in the ways specified in the document. You can make the durable power of attorney broad in scope or quite limited, and it becomes active as soon as you sign it. Under this document, the person may sign checks for you, enter contracts on your behalf, even buy or sell your assets. What they can do depends on what you authorized in the document.

For those who ultimately may need long term care, having a durable power of attorney in place before the need for the long term care arises, can allow for eligibility for Medicaid benefits that otherwise may be beyond reach of the incapacitated person. If the power of attorney is not already in place when dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease, or other debilitating diseases arise, the lack of a durable power of attorney could cost your family thousands of dollars a month.  A properly drafted and signed power of attorney can bring those funds back to the family – legally and ethically.

In the case of a “springing” power of attorney (POA), also known as a conditional power of attorney, the person only has this authority if you become incapacitated. At that point, the POA “springs” into action.  Florida law does not allow the use of springing powers of attorney any longer, but those signed prior to October 1, 2011 are deemed to be legally effective.  However, there is no statutory basis for forcing a third party to honor a power of attorney signed before October 1, 2011, so if you have such a power of attorney you may want to seriously consider having it updated to comply with the statute that became effective on that date.

There is no “best” power of attorney. We’ll work with you to determine which is the best fit for your needs and goals.

Health Care Power of Attorney

In an instant, an accident can change a healthy, vigorous person into someone who can’t make her healthcare decisions. Others face a long decline in mental capacity because of a disease like Alzheimer’s. In either case, you want to empower those you trust to make medical decisions for you. Though health care legal documents vary somewhat by state, the general principle is that, through this document, you authorize someone to make medical decisions for you, if and when you no longer have the capacity to do so. You can also communicate your desired treatment and end-of-life care. However, those instructions may not be valid in every state.

A Holistic Approach

Lifetime planning is a comprehensive approach to estate planning. And while it addresses needs of the living, comprehensive planning may also improve the after-death part of your plan as well, because it can reduce family conflict and preserve assets against court control or interference in the event of incapacity.

Contact an Experienced Estate Planning Attorney

For insight into how to establish a trust, whether it be a revocable trust or an irrevocable trust, and implement other lifetime planning options, call us today to schedule a consultation.

florida durable power of attorney, elder law attorney and lawyer

Sign a Power of Attorney Before It’s Too Late

durable power of attorney by elder law attorney and lawyerIn my last post to this blog, I explained why it is so important to put in place a durable power of attorney.  In this post, I want to emphasize why it is important to get that power of attorney in place before you need it.  If you wait until you need it, you’ll be too late.

Why Do I Need A Durable Power of Attorney?

As we discussed in that prior post, a durable power of attorney is an extremely important estate planning tool, even more important than a will in many cases.  This crucial document allows a person you appoint — your “attorney-in-fact” or “agent” — to act in place of you — the “principal” — for financial, business and legal, purposes when and if you ever become incapacitated due to dementia or some other reason, such as a stroke, heart attack, automobile accident, or other reasons that might arise.  The agent under the durable power of attorney can quickly step in and take care of your affairs.

To properly execute a power of attorney and name an agent to stand in your shoes, you need to have legal capacity.  Regrettably, many people delay completing this vital estate planning step until it’s too late and they no longer legally have the capacity for signing the document and giving it full legal effect.  Won’t wait until its too late!

What Happens If You Do Not Have A Durable Power of Attorney?

What happens then? Without a properly executed durable power of attorney, no one can represent you unless a court appoints a conservator or guardian. That court process takes lots of time, costs lots of money, and the judge may not choose the person you would prefer. In addition, under a guardianship or conservatorship, the representative may have to seek court permission to take planning steps, make long term care decisions, engage in basic financial transactions, that your agent could implement immediately with a properly executed simple durable power of attorney.  In effect, the judge, or the person appointed by the judge as your guardian, will be “in charge” of determining what issues are brought to the probate judge’s attention.  Either the judge or the guardian will be making decisions that may have a profound effect on you and your family.  No one really wants to be the subject of a guardianship.

This is why it’s so important that you have a durable power of attorney in place before the capacity to sign the document becomes an issue.  The standard for legal capacity with respect to durable powers of attorney varies from state to state. Some courts and lawyers argue that this threshold can be quite low: that you need only know that you trust the agent to manage your financial affairs. Others argue that since the agent generally has the right to enter into contracts on behalf of the principal, the principal should have the capacity to enter into contracts as well, and the threshold for entering into contracts is fairly high.  In Florida, you must show that the person signing the durable power of attorney has the capacity, and does in fact understand, who are the natural objects of his or her estate (the identity of children, grandchildren, etc.), and the nature, approximate value, and the extent of the estate assets.

How Do I Choose An Agent to Act on My Behalf?

If you do not have someone you trust to appoint as your agent, it may be more appropriate to have the probate court looking over the shoulder of the person who is handling your affairs through a guardianship or conservatorship. In that case, you may want to sign a limited durable power of attorney that simply nominates the person you want to serve as your conservator or guardian. Most states require the court to respect your nomination “except for good cause or disqualification.”

Because you need a third party to assess capacity and because you need to be certain that the formal legal requirements are followed, it can be risky to prepare and execute legal documents on your own without representation by an attorney. To sign a durable power of attorney before it’s too late, contact a local experienced elder law attorney.

Can I Prepare My Own Power of Attorney?

If you insist on preparing your own Florida durable power of attorney, without the assistance of a Florida attorney because you don’t want to meet with one or pay for one, we actually offer a power of attorney for you to prepare online that complies with all of the changes in the Florida power of attorney statute that was completely rewritten in 2011.  We review your input for that power of attorney so that you can know that it will be enforceable in Florida.